cradle

cradle [krād′'l]
n.
[ME cradel < OE cradol < * kradula, little basket; akin to OHG kratto, basket < IE base * ger-, to twist, turn > CRANK1, CRAMP1, CREEK]
1. a baby's small bed, usually on rockers
2. the earliest period of one's life; infancy
3. the place of a thing's beginning or early development [the cradle of civilization]
4. Old Poet. a place of rest [rocked in the cradle of the deep]
5. anything resembling a cradle or used somewhat like a cradle, as for holding or rocking; specif.,
a) wooden or metal framework to support or lift a boat, ship, aircraft, etc. that is being built or repaired
b) CREEPER (sense 7)
c) the support on which the handset of a telephone (cradle telephone) rests when not in use
d) Agric. a frame fastened to a scythe (cradle scythe) so that the grain can be laid evenly as it is cut
e) Med. a frame for keeping bedclothes from touching an injured limb, etc.
f) Mining a boxlike device on rockers, for washing the gold out of gold-bearing sand
vt.
cradled, cradling
1. to place, rock, or hold in or as in a cradle
2. to take care of in infancy; nurture
3. to cut (grain) with a cradle scythe
4. Mining to wash (gold-bearing sand) in a cradle
vi.
Obs. to lie in or as in a cradle
to lie in or as in a cradle
——————
rob the cradle
to take as one's sweetheart or one's spouse a person much younger than oneself

English World dictionary. . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cradle — may refer to: Mechanical devices: Bassinet, a small bed, often on rockers, in which babies and small children sleep Ship cradle, supports a ship that is dry docked Cradle (grain), in agriculture is a device based upon a scythe to cleanly reap and …   Wikipedia

  • Cradle — Cra dle (kr[=a]d l), n. [AS. cradel, cradol, prob. from Celtic; cf. Gael. creathall, Ir. craidhal, W. cryd a shaking or rocking, a cradle; perh. akin to E. crate.] 1. A bed or cot for a baby, oscillating on rockers or swinging on pivots; hence,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cradle — Cra dle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cradled} ( d ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Cradling} ( dl?ng).] 1. To lay to rest, or rock, as in a cradle; to lull or quiet, as by rocking. [1913 Webster] It cradles their fears to sleep. D. A. Clark. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cradle — ► NOUN 1) a baby s bed or cot, especially one mounted on rockers. 2) a place or period in which something originates or flourishes: the cradle of civilization. 3) a supporting framework resembling a cradle, in particular for a boat under repair… …   English terms dictionary

  • cradle — [n1] small bed for baby baby bed, bassinet, cot, crib, hamper, Moses basket, pannier, trundle bed; concept 443 cradle [n2] early childhood; origins babyhood, beginning, birthplace, fount, fountain, fountainhead, infancy, nativity, nursery, origin …   New thesaurus

  • Cradle — Cra dle, v. i. To lie or lodge, as in a cradle. [1913 Webster] Withered roots and husks wherein the acorn cradled. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cradle — index bear (support), genesis, lull, origin (source), origination, source Burton s Legal Thesaurus …   Law dictionary

  • cradle — cradler, n. /krayd l/, n., v., cradled, cradling. n. 1. a small bed for an infant, usually on rockers. 2. any of various supports for objects set horizontally, as the support for the handset of a telephone. 3. the place where anything is nurtured …   Universalium

  • cradle — cra|dle1 [ˈkreıdl] n [: Old English; Origin: cradol] 1.) a small bed for a baby, especially one that moves gently from side to side →↑cot ▪ She rocked the cradle to quieten the child. 2.) the cradle of sth formal the place where something… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • cradle — [[t]kre͟ɪd(ə)l[/t]] cradles, cradling, cradled 1) N COUNT A cradle is a baby s bed with high sides. Cradles often have curved bases so that they rock from side to side. Syn: crib 2) N COUNT The cradle is the part of a telephone on which the… …   English dictionary

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